Excel

SLN: Excel Formulae Explained

How do you use SLN in Excel?

SLN is used in Excel to calculate the depreciation of an asset for a specific time period. The formula is: SLN = ((cost - salvage) / (2 ^ (year - 1))). This formula takes the cost of the asset, subtracts the salvage value, and then divides that by the number of years divided by two. This will give you the depreciation for that year.

What is the syntax of SLN in Excel?

The SLN syntax in Excel is as follows:

SLN(,,,,)

This function calculates the straight line depreciation for a given investment over a given number of periods. The is the year in which the investment is made, the is the annual discount rate, the is the expected value of the investment at the end of the period, the is the amount of the investment, and the is the number of periods over which the depreciation is calculated.

What is an example of how to use SLN in Excel?

SLN is used in Excel for calculating the estimated completion time for a task based on the amount of work that has been completed so far. This can be useful for project managers who need to plan their resources and budget appropriately. To use SLN in Excel, you will need to enter the estimated completion time and the amount of work completed so far for each task. Excel will then calculate the estimated completion time for each task based on the data entered.

When should you not use SLN in Excel?

There are a few instances when you should not use SLN in Excel. One is when you have a closed workbook and you want to calculate the SLN on a different workbook. Another instance is when you have a workbook with a lot of formulas and you want to calculate the SLN on a different workbook that doesn't have any formulas.

What are some similar formulae to SLN in Excel?

There are a few similar formulae to SLN in Excel. One is NPV (net present value), which calculates the present value of cash flows over a period of time. Another is IRR (internal rate of return), which calculates the rate of return on an investment. Finally, there is ROI (return on investment), which calculates the amount of profit generated from an investment.

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