Google Sheets

ODD: Google Sheets Formulae Explained

How do you use ODD in Google Sheets?

There are a few ways to use ODD in Google Sheets. The first way is to use the =ODD() function. This function will return the odd number in a list of numbers. The second way is to use the =MOD() function. This function will return the modulus of two numbers. The third way is to use the =IF() function. This function will return the value of a statement if it is true, or return the value of another statement if it is false.

What is the syntax of ODD in Google Sheets?

The syntax of ODD in Google Sheets is very simple. You just need to type "=ODD(number)" and the function will return the result. For example, if you want to know if the number 5 is odd, you can just type "=ODD(5)" in a cell and the function will return "TRUE".

What is an example of how to use ODD in Google Sheets?

One example of how to use ODD in Google Sheets is to create a table of data with two columns and three rows, and then apply the ODD function to the first column. In the first row, the function will return the value 1, in the second row it will return the value 2, and in the third row it will return the value 3. This can be repeated for any number of rows and columns.

When should you not use ODD in Google Sheets?

There are a few occasions when you should not use ODD in Google Sheets. Firstly, if you are trying to create a formula that will calculate the average of a list of numbers, you should use the AVERAGE function instead of ODD. Secondly, if you are trying to create a formula that will determine the sum of a list of numbers, you should use the SUM function instead of ODD. Lastly, if you are trying to create a formula that will find the largest number in a list of numbers, you should use the LARGE function instead of ODD.

What are some similar formulae to ODD in Google Sheets?

There are a few similar formulae to ODD in Google Sheets. The first is the MOD function, which returns the remainder after dividing two numbers. The second is the AND function, which returns true if all of its arguments are true. The third is the OR function, which returns true if at least one of its arguments is true.

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