Excel

ISERR: Excel Formulae Explained

How do you use ISERR in Excel?

ISERR is an Excel function that returns the #N/A error value if the supplied argument is not an error value. The ISERR function can be used to test whether a value is an error value, and to return error values in formulas.

What is the syntax of ISERR in Excel?

ISERR is a built-in function in Microsoft Excel that returns the error code for the last error that occurred. The syntax for ISERR is as follows:

=ISERR()

What is an example of how to use ISERR in Excel?

ISERR is a built-in function in Excel that can be used to check for errors in a given range of cells. The function takes two arguments: the first is the range of cells you want to check for errors, and the second is the error value you want to return if an error is found. For example, if you want to check for errors in the range A1:A10, you would use the following formula:

=ISERR(A1:A10)

If an error is found in one of the cells in the range, the function will return the value that you specified as the second argument (in this case, "ERROR"). This can be useful for identifying and troubleshooting errors in your data.

When should you not use ISERR in Excel?

ISERR should not be used when Excel is attempting to calculate a result. For example, the formula =A1/A2 will result in an error if A1 is empty. In this case, Excel will use the value 0 for the calculation. If ISERR is used in this formula, the result will be #DIV/0!.

What are some similar formulae to ISERR in Excel?

ISERR is the formula for generating an error value in Excel. It is used to calculate the error value that is returned when a function or formula is unable to calculate a value. Other similar formulas in Excel include:

ISERROR: This is a formula that checks for the presence of an error value in a range of cells. If an error value is found, the formula returns TRUE; otherwise, it returns FALSE.

IFERROR: This is a formula that checks for the presence of an error value in a range of cells. If an error value is found, the formula returns the value that is specified by the user; otherwise, it returns the original value.

ERROR: This is a function that returns the error value that is associated with a given number.

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