Excel

INT: Excel Formulae Explained

How do you use INT in Excel?

The INT function in Excel is used to convert a number to an integer. The function takes a number as an input and truncates any decimal values to the nearest integer. For example, the INT function can be used to round a number up or down. The function can also be used to calculate the integer portion of a number.

What is the syntax of INT in Excel?

The syntax of INT in Excel is to use the INT function and enter the value you want to convert to integer. For example, if you enter the value "5.5" into the INT function, it will return the value "5".

What is an example of how to use INT in Excel?

One example of how to use INT in Excel is to use it as a function in a formula. For example, the formula =INT(A1) would return the integer value of the number in cell A1. Another example of how to use INT in Excel is to use it as a part of a VLOOKUP formula. For example, the formula =VLOOKUP(INT(A1), Sheet1!$A:$D, 2, FALSE) would return the value in the second column of the range Sheet1!$A:$D that is closest to the integer value in cell A1.

When should you not use INT in Excel?

There are several instances when you should not use INT in Excel. One is when you are trying to calculate the average of a set of numbers that contain decimal points. In this case, you should use the AVERAGE function, which will automatically calculate the average of the numbers, regardless of their type. Another instance when you should not use INT is when you are working with data that is generated from a foreign source. In this case, you may need to use the Excel function TEXT to convert the data to text before you can calculate the average.

What are some similar formulae to INT in Excel?

There are a few similar formulae to INT in Excel. One is the SUMPRODUCT function, which can be used to sum the products of arrays of numbers. Another is the MOD function, which returns the remainder after division. The ROUND function can also be used to round numbers to a specific number of decimal places.

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