Google Sheets

IFS: Google Sheets Formulae Explained

How do you use IFS in Google Sheets?

IFS is a function that can be used in Google Sheets to test a condition and return a value based on the outcome. The function can be used to test a range of conditions, including whether a value is greater than or less than another value, whether a value is within a certain range, or whether a value is equal to another value. The IFS function can be used in a formula to return a value based on the condition that is test.

What is the syntax of IFS in Google Sheets?

The syntax of IFS in Google Sheets is a set of characters that can be used to split a text string into a list of items. The characters that are used in the syntax are the comma (,), the pipe (|), and the space ( ). The IFS syntax can be used to split text strings that are stored in cells in a Google Sheet, and the split text strings can be used in formulas and functions in the Google Sheet. For example, the following formula uses the IFS syntax to split a text string into a list of items, and the list of items is then used in the SUM function to calculate the sum of the items in the list:

=SUM(IFS(A1,",",B1,"|"))

The IFS syntax can also be used in the VLOOKUP function in Google Sheets. For example, the following formula uses the IFS syntax to split a text string into a list of items, and the list of items is then used as the lookup_values argument in the VLOOKUP function:

=VLOOKUP(A1,IFS(A1,",",B1,"|"),2,0)

What is an example of how to use IFS in Google Sheets?

IFS can be used in Google Sheets to create a formula that will return a value based on a set of conditions. In the formula, the IFS function is used to test a condition for each of a series of values, and then return the value associated with the first condition that is met. An example of how to use the IFS function in Google Sheets can be found below.

In the example, the IFS function is used to return a value based on whether a cell is greater than or equal to 10, less than or equal to 20, or contains the text "Hello". In the first row of the table, the IFS function is used to return the value "A" if the cell is greater than or equal to 10, the value "B" if the cell is less than or equal to 20, and the value "C" if the cell contains the text "Hello". In the second row of the table, the IFS function is used to return the value "D" if the cell is greater than or equal to 10, the value "E" if the cell is less than or equal to 20, and the value "F" if the cell contains the text "Hello".

When should you not use IFS in Google Sheets?

IFS should not be used in Google Sheets when you need to compare values in two different cells. For example, if you need to compare the value in cell A1 to the value in cell B1, you should use the = operator, not IFS.

What are some similar formulae to IFS in Google Sheets?

There are a few similar formulae to IFS in Google Sheets. One is the INDEX function, which allows you to return a specific value from a range of cells. Another is the VLOOKUP function, which allows you to lookup values in a table. Additionally, the QUERY function can be used to extract data from a range of cells into a new table. Lastly, the IMPORTDATA function can be used to import data from a text file into a Google Sheet.

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