Excel

FIXED: Excel Formulae Explained

How do you use FIXED in Excel?

FIXED is a function in Excel that locks a cell's value so that it does not change when the formula in the cell is copied to other cells. This is useful for ensuring that a cell's value does not change when the formula in the cell is copied to other cells, for example, when calculating a sum.

What is the syntax of FIXED in Excel?

FIXED is a function in Excel that takes a number and a percentage as arguments and returns the number multiplied by the percentage. The syntax for FIXED is FIXED(number, percentage).

What is an example of how to use FIXED in Excel?

One way to use the FIXED function in Excel is to lock a cell's value so that it does not change when you update the spreadsheet. This can be useful if you want to ensure that a particular number does not change, for instance the total cost of a project. You can also use the FIXED function to create a reference to a specific cell in a formula. For example, if you want to calculate the average of a series of numbers, you can use the following formula: =AVERAGE(FIXED(B3:B10,1),FIXED(C3:C10,1)). This will calculate the average of the cells in the B3:B10 and C3:C10 ranges, treating the values in those cells as constants.

When should you not use FIXED in Excel?

There are a few instances when you should not use FIXED in Excel. If you have a cell that you want to automatically update when data in another cell changes, you should use the VLOOKUP function instead of the FIXED function. Additionally, you should not use the FIXED function if you want to print your worksheet with the cell values formatted as text.

What are some similar formulae to FIXED in Excel?

In Excel, the FIXED function returns a text string with a fixed number of decimal places. There are a few similar formulae that you can use to achieve the same result. The TRIM function removes all extra spaces from a text string, while the ROUND function rounds a number to a specific number of decimal places. Finally, the CONCATENATE function combines two or more text strings into one.

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