Excel

FILTERXML: Excel Formulae Explained

How do you use FILTERXML in Excel?

FILTERXML is a function in Excel that allows you to extract data from an XML file. You can use FILTERXML to extract data from a specific node in an XML file, or to extract data from all nodes in an XML file. You can also use FILTERXML to extract data from an XML file that is embedded in a worksheet.

What is the syntax of FILTERXML in Excel?

FILTERXML is a function in Excel that allows you to extract data from an XML file. The syntax of the function is:

FILTERXML(xml_file, XPath_query)

xml_file is the name of the XML file from which you want to extract data.

XPath_query is the XPath query that you want to use to extract data from the XML file.

What is an example of how to use FILTERXML in Excel?

FILTERXML is a function in Excel that allows you to extract data from an XML file. An example of how to use FILTERXML is to create a table that includes information from an XML file. The XML file that you use for this example can be downloaded from the following website: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=39781.

Once you have downloaded the XML file, you can open it in Excel. The XML file contains information about different versions of Excel. The table that you create will include the following information:

-The Excel version

-The build number of the Excel version

-The release date of the Excel version

-The description of the Excel version

To create the table, you will use the FILTERXML function. The syntax for the FILTERXML function is as follows:

FILTERXML(xml_file, node_name, xpath_expression)

The xml_file is the name of the XML file that you are using. The node_name is the name of the node that you want to extract data from. The xpath_expression is the XPath expression that you want to use to extract the data.

The following steps will show you how to create the table that includes information from the XML file:

1. Open the XML file in Excel.

2. Select the cell where you want to create the table.

3. Type the following formula:

=FILTERXML(“ExcelVersions.xml”, “version”, “//build”)

4. Press the ENTER key.

5. The cell will now contain the build number for the Excel version that is currently open.

6. To extract the release date for the Excel version that is currently open, type the following formula:

=FILTERXML(“ExcelVersions.xml”, “version”, “//release”)

7. Press the ENTER key.

8. The cell will now contain the release date for the Excel version that is currently open.

9. To extract the description for the Excel version that is currently open, type the following formula:

=FILTERXML(“ExcelVersions.xml”, “version”, “//description”)

10. Press the ENTER key.

11. The cell will now contain the description for the Excel version that is currently open.

When should you not use FILTERXML in Excel?

FILTERXML should not be used in Excel under the following circumstances:

1. When the XML data is not well-formed.

2. When the XML data is not in the expected format.

3. When the XML data is too large to be processed by Excel.

4. When the XML data is not in the correct structure for the desired operation.

5. When the XML data is not in the correct format for the desired operation.

What are some similar formulae to FILTERXML in Excel?

The FILTERXML function in Excel is used to extract data from an XML file. It is similar to the FILTER function, which is used to extract data from a list or table. The FILTERXML function takes two arguments: the XML file and the XPath expression. The XPath expression is used to specify the data that you want to extract from the XML file. The FILTERXML function is similar to the VLOOKUP function, which is used to extract data from a table. The VLOOKUP function takes four arguments: the table, the column in the table, the value to search for, and the type of search. The VLOOKUP function is similar to the INDEX function, which is used to extract data from a list. The INDEX function takes two arguments: the list and the position of the value that you want to extract.

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