Excel

DMAX: Excel Formulae Explained

How do you use DMAX in Excel?

DMAX is a function used in Excel to calculate the maximum value in a given range of cells. To use the DMAX function, you first need to enter the range of cells you want to calculate the maximum value in. Next, enter the formula "=DMAX(range)" and press enter. Excel will then calculate the maximum value in the given range.

What is the syntax of DMAX in Excel?

The syntax for the DMAX function in Excel is as follows:

DMAX(range, criteria)

The range argument is the set of cells that you want to evaluate. The criteria argument is the condition that you want to evaluate.

What is an example of how to use DMAX in Excel?

The DMAX function in Excel returns the largest value in a given column. For example, if you had a list of numbers in column A, you could use the DMAX function to find the largest number in the list. To do this, you would type "DMAX(A:A)" into the formula bar. This will return the largest number in the column.

When should you not use DMAX in Excel?

There are several instances when you should not use DMAX in Excel. One instance is when you are trying to reference a value in a different sheet. Another instance is when you are trying to reference a value that is in a different workbook. Additionally, you should not use DMAX when you are trying to reference a value that is in a different range.

What are some similar formulae to DMAX in Excel?

There are a few similar formulae to DMAX in Excel. The first is DMIN, which finds the minimum value in a range. The second is DAVERAGE, which finds the average value in a range. The third is DSTDEV, which finds the standard deviation of a range. The fourth is DSTDEVP, which finds the standard deviation of a population. The fifth is DGET, which retrieves a specific value from a range. The sixth is DMAX.PRODUCT, which finds the product of the maximum values in a range. The seventh is DMAX.SUM, which finds the sum of the maximum values in a range. The eighth is MAX, which finds the maximum value in a range.

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