Google Sheets

CHIINV: Google Sheets Formulae Explained

How do you use CHIINV in Google Sheets?

In Google Sheets, the CHIINV function is used to calculate the inverse of the chi-squared distribution. The function takes two arguments: the first is the number of degrees of freedom, and the second is the value of the chi-squared statistic. The inverse of the chi-squared distribution is used to calculate the p-value for a chi-squared statistic.

What is the syntax of CHIINV in Google Sheets?

The syntax of the CHIINV function in Google Sheets is as follows: =CHIINV(x,alpha) Where x is the value at which you want to find the inverse of the chi-squared distribution and alpha is the degrees of freedom.

What is an example of how to use CHIINV in Google Sheets?

Assuming you have a list of data in A1:A10, the following formula will calculate the inverse of the data:

=CHIINV(A1:A10)

When should you not use CHIINV in Google Sheets?

There are a few occasions when you should not use the CHIINV function in Google Sheets. One such occasion is when you are trying to calculate the inverse of a matrix that is not square. Another occasion is when you are trying to calculate the inverse of a matrix that is singular.

What are some similar formulae to CHIINV in Google Sheets?

There are a few similar formulae to CHIINV in Google Sheets, including COUNTIFS(), SUMIFS(), and AVERAGEIFS(). These formulae allow you to count, sum, or average a range of cells based on specific criteria that you specify. For example, you could use the COUNTIFS() formula to count the number of times a specific word appears in a range of cells, or the SUMIFS() formula to sum the values in a range of cells based on a specific criteria. The AVERAGEIFS() formula is similar to the SUMIFS() formula, but instead of summing the values in a range of cells, it averages them.

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