Excel Guides

Superscripts in Custom Formats in Excel

When creating custom formats in Excel, you may want to use superscripts to denote certain values. For example, you might want to use a superscripted 1 to represent the value of 10-1. To do this, you'll need to use the escape code \s.

The \s escape code tells Excel to interpret the following character as a superscript. So, if you want to format a number as 10-1, you would use the format code # \s#0.00E+0. This format code would display 123456789 as 1.23E-8.

You can also use the \s escape code in date and time formats. For example, if you wanted to display the date as 3/14/15, you would use the format code m/d/yyyy\s@. This would display the date as 3/14/15@.

You can also use superscripts in custom number formats. For example, if you wanted to display a number in scientific notation with a superscripted exponent, you could use the format code #0.00E+0\s#. This would display 123456789 as 1.23E+8.

If you want to use multiple superscripts in a custom format, you can nest escape codes. For example, if you wanted to display a number in scientific notation with a superscripted exponent and a superscripted coefficient, you could use the format code #0.00E+0\s#\^#. This would display 123456789 as 1.23X108. You can nest escape codes up to eight levels deep.

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