Excel Guides

Stopping Excel from Converting UNC Paths to Mapped Drives in Excel

If you use Microsoft Excel on a regular basis, you may have noticed that it has a tendency to convert UNC paths to mapped drives. This can be extremely frustrating, especially if you need to share files with others who do not have the same mapped drives on their computer. There are a few ways to stop this from happening, which we will discuss in this article.

Method 1: Use the 'Paste Special' Option

One way to prevent Excel from converting UNC paths to mapped drives is to use the 'Paste Special' option instead of the regular 'Paste' option. To do this, simply copy the UNC path that you want to paste into Excel, and then click on the cell where you want to paste it. Next, click on the 'Home' tab at the top of the screen, and then click on the small arrow in the bottom-right corner of the 'Paste' button. This will open up a drop-down menu with various paste options. Select 'Paste Special' from this menu.

When the 'Paste Special' dialog box appears, make sure that the 'Unformatted Text' option is selected, and then click on the 'OK' button. This will paste the UNC path into Excel without converting it to a mapped drive.

Method 2: Use an Absolute Path

Another way to stop Excel from converting UNC paths to mapped drives is to use an absolute path instead of a relative path. An absolute path is the full path from the root directory, while a relative path is a partial path that is relative to the current directory. For example, if you are currently in the C:\Documents and Settings\username\My Documents directory, a relative path would be something like My Documents\file.xlsx, while an absolute path would be C:\Documents and Settings\username\My Documents\file.xlsx.

To use an absolute path in Excel, simply type out the full path of the file that you want to open, including the drive letter and all directories. For example, if you wanted to open the file C:\Documents and Settings\username\My Documents\file.xlsx, you would simply type that into the cell where you want to insert it. This will prevent Excel from converting UNC paths to mapped drives.

Method 3: Use Single Quotes

Another way to keep Excel from converting UNC paths into mapped drives is by using single quotes around the path. This method only works if you are using an absolute path; it will not work with relative paths. For example, if you wanted to open the file C:\Documents and Settings\username\My Documents\file.xlsx using this method, you would type 'C:\Documents and Settings\username\My Documents\file.xlsx' into the cell where you want to insert it.

Method 4: Change Your Default Drive

If you find yourself regularly needing to insert UNC paths into Excel, you may want to consider changing your default drive letter. This can be done by going into your Control Panel and opening up th

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