Excel Guides

Rounding in Results in Excel

When you round a number in Excel, you are essentially telling the program to replace that number with another number that is closer to zero. The way that it determines which number is closest to zero is by looking at the digit in the first decimal place. If that digit is between 0 and 4, it will round the number down. If the digit is between 5 and 9, it will round the number up.

For example, if you have a number like 12.3456 and you want to round it to two decimal places, Excel will look at the digit in the third decimal place (4). Since 4 is between 0 and 4, Excel will round 12.3456 down to 12.34. On the other hand, if you have a number like 12.3556 and you want to round it to two decimal places, Excel will look at the digit in the third decimal place (5). Since 5 is between 5 and 9, Excel will round 12.3556 up to 12.36.

You can also tell Excel how many decimal places you want it to use when rounding a number. For example, if you have a number like 12.3456 and you want to round it to four decimal places, Excel will look at the digit in the fifth decimal place (6). Since 6 is between 0 and 4, Excel will round 12.3456 down to 12.3456. On the other hand, if you have a number like 12.3556 and you want to round it to four decimal places, Excel will look at the digit in the fifth decimal place (5). Since 5 is between 5 and 9, Excel will round 12.3556 up to 12.3556.

You can also use negative numbers when telling Excel how many decimal places to use when rounding a number. For example, if you have a number like 12.3456 and you want to round it to two decimal places, you would use -2 as the argument for the ROUND function. This would tell Excel to look at the digit in the second decimal place (3) when determining which number to use for rounding.

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