Excel Guides

How to Use Relative References to Cells in Other Workbooks in Excel

When working with data in Excel, you may find yourself needing to reference cells in other workbooks. This can be done using relative references. Relative references are cell addresses that are relative to the position of the cell containing the formula. For example, if you have a formula in cell A1 that needs to reference cell B1, you would use a relative reference. If you then copy that formula to cell C1, the reference will automatically change to C1. This is because the reference is relative to the position of the cell containing the formula.

To use a relative reference in a formula, simply enter the cell address using regular notation (e.g. A1, B2, etc.). When you copy or move the formula, the reference will automatically adjust.

You can also use relative references to refer to cells in other workbooks. To do this, use the file name followed by an exclamation point (!) and then the cell address. For example, if you have a formula in cell A1 that needs to reference cell B1 in another workbook named "Data", you would use the following syntax:

[Data.xlsx]Sheet1!B1

When you copy or move the formula, the reference will automatically adjust to match the new location. Note that you must enclose the file name in square brackets if it contains any spaces or special characters.

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