Excel Guides

Controlling the Plotting of Empty Cells in Excel

When it comes to Excel, there are a lot of different ways that you can control the plotting of empty cells. One way is to use the built-in options that are available in Excel. You can access these options by going to the File tab, and then selecting Options. From here, you will want to select the Advanced tab, and scroll down to the Display options for this workbook section. Here, you will see an option that says Show a zero in cells that have zero value. You will want to make sure that this option is selected so that your empty cells will show up as zeroes on your plot.

Another way that you can control the plotting of empty cells in Excel is by using a custom number format. To do this, you first need to select the cells that you want to apply the format to. Once you have those cells selected, you will want to go to the Home tab, and click on the small arrow in the bottom right corner of the Number group. This will open up a menu of different number formatting options. From here, you will want to select Custom. In the Type box, you will want to enter 0;;@;;;@. This format code tells Excel to display zeroes in cells that are empty, and leave cells that contain text or numbers unchanged.

You can also use conditional formatting to control the plotting of empty cells in Excel. To do this, you first need to select the cells that you want to apply the format to. Once you have those cells selected, you will want to go to the Home tab, and click on Conditional Formatting in the Styles group. From here, you will want to select New Rule. In the New Formatting Rule dialog box that appears, you will want to select Format only cells that contain from the drop-down menu. In the next drop-down menu, you will want to select Blanks from the list of options. Finally, click on the Format button, and choose your desired format for empty cells from the Format Cells dialog box.

There are a few other things that you can do to control the plotting of empty cells in Excel as well. For example, if you have a lot of data in your worksheet, you may want to consider using a filter so that only certain data is plotted on your graph or chart. You can also use error bars so that any empty cells are not included in your data set. And finally, if all else fails, you can always just delete any empty rows or columns before creating your graph or chart.

Move beyond 

Excel

Get started with Causal today.
Build models effortlessly, connect them directly to your data, and share them with interactive dashboards and beautiful visuals.