Excel Guides

Calculating Future Workdays in Excel

There are a few different ways that you can calculate future workdays in Excel. One way is to use the WORKDAY function. This function takes two arguments: the start date and the number of days that you want to add. For example, if today is March 3rd and you want to calculate what the date will be in 10 workdays, you would use the following formula:

=WORKDAY(TODAY(),10)

This would give you a result of March 17th, since there are no weekends or holidays between today and that date.

If you want to exclude weekends and holidays from your calculation, you can use the WORKDAY.INTL function. This function takes three arguments: the start date, the number of days to add, and an integer code for which weekends you want to exclude. For example, if you want to calculate what the date will be in 10 workdays excluding Saturdays and Sundays, you would use the following formula:

=WORKDAY.INTL(TODAY(),10,1)

The result of this formula would be March 21st.

You can also use the NETWORKDAYS function to calculate future workdays. This function takes two arguments: the start date and the end date. It will then return the number of workdays between those two dates, excluding weekends and holidays. For example, if today is March 3rd and you want to know how many workdays there are until March 17th, you would use the following formula:

=NETWORKDAYS(TODAY(),17)

This would give you a result of 10, since there are no weekends or holidays between those two dates.

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