Excel shortcuts

The Best Excel Shortcut for Absolute References on Mac

If you work with Microsoft Excel on a Mac, you know that there are some big differences between the Mac and Windows versions. One of the most frustrating differences is the way that absolute references work. On a Mac, the default behavior is for references to be relative, which can make it very difficult to work with complex formulas. Fortunately, there is a keyboard shortcut that you can use to change a reference to an absolute reference. In this article, we'll show you how to use this shortcut to make your life a lot easier.

When you enter a formula in Excel, the default behavior is for the references to be relative. This means that if you enter a formula in cell A1 that references cell B1, and then you copy that formula to cell A2, the reference will change to B2. This can be very frustrating, especially if you're working with a complex formula that has many different references. Fortunately, there is a way to change a reference to an absolute reference. To do this, you simply need to add a dollar sign ($) before the column reference and/or row reference.

For example, let's say that you have a formula in cell A1 that references cell B1. The formula might look something like this:

=B1*2

If you copy this formula to cell A2, the reference will change to B2. However, if you add a dollar sign before the B in the formula, the reference will stay the same. The formula will look like this:

=$B$1*2

Now, when you copy the formula to cell A2, the reference will still be B1. This can be very helpful when you're working with complex formulas.

There is a keyboard shortcut that you can use to quickly add dollar signs to a reference. To do this, simply select the reference that you want to change, and then press F4. This will cycle through the different reference options. The first time you press F4, the reference will change to an absolute reference. The second time you press it, the reference will change to a relative reference. The third time you press it, the reference will change to a mixed reference. And the fourth time you press it, the reference will go back to the original reference.

This shortcut can be very helpful when you're working with complex formulas. It can save you a lot of time and frustration. So next time you're working with a formula on a Mac, be sure to give this shortcut a try.

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