Excel Guides

Stopping a Formula from Updating References in Excel

If you have a formula in Excel that is referencing other cells, you may want to prevent the formula from updating when those other cells change. This can be useful if you want to keep a certain result constant, even if the values in the referenced cells change. There are a few different ways to do this:

  1. You can use the $ symbol before the row and column reference in your formula. For example, if your formula was =A1+B1, you could change it to =$A$1+$B$1. This will make both the row and column references absolute, so they won't change even if you copy or move the formula.
  2. You can use a mixed reference, which uses the $ symbol for only one of the row or column references. For example, if your formula was =A1+B1, you could change it to =A$1+$B1. This will make the row reference absolute (so it won't change if you copy or move the formula), but the column reference will still be relative (so it will update if you copy or move the formula).
  3. You can use the INDEX function, which allows you to specify which cell you want to reference, without using a cell address. For example, if your formula was =A1+B1, you could change it to =INDEX(A:A,1)+INDEX(B:B,1). This will make both the row and column references absolute, so they won't change even if you copy or move the formula.
  4. OFFSET function, which allows you to specify a range of cells that you want to reference. For example, if your formula was =A1+B1, you could change it to

    =OFFSET($A$1,,)0,)+OFFSET($B$1,,)0,)

  5. ROWS function, which allows you to specify how many rows down from a certain cell you want to reference. For example, if your formula was =A1+B1, you could change it to

    < span size =" 3 " >< span face =" Arial " > = < p >< code > < em > < p >< code > < span size =" 3 " >< span face =" Arial " >< span color =" #000000 " > ROWS ($ A $ 1 , , ) + ROWS ($ B $ 1 , , ) 0 , ) < / li > & nbsp ; & nbsp ; & nbsp ; You can also use an array constant & nbsp ; (enclosed in curly braces {}), which allows & nbsp ;you & nbsp ;to specify multiple cells that & nbsp ;you want & nbsp ;to reference . For example , & nbsp ;if your & nbsp ;formula was   ;)  ;;  ;;  ;;  ;;  ;;  ;;  ;;  ;;  ;;&n

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