Excel Guides

How to Fill a Drawing Object in Excel

There are a few different ways that you can fill a drawing object in Excel. You can use the fill handle, the fill command, or the paint bucket tool. Each method has its own advantages and disadvantages, so you'll need to decide which one is right for your needs.

Using the Fill Handle

The fill handle is a small square that appears in the bottom-right corner of a selected cell. To use the fill handle, simply click and drag it in the direction that you want to fill. Excel will automatically fill in the cells with the appropriate data.

One advantage of using the fill handle is that it's very quick and easy to use. However, it can be difficult to control exactly how Excel fills in the cells. For example, if you're trying to fill in a column of numbers and there are some blank cells in the column, Excel may try to fill those blank cells with random numbers.

Using the Fill Command

The fill command is located in the Home tab of the ribbon. To use the fill command, simply select the cells that you want to fill and then click the "Fill" button. A menu will appear with several different options for how you can fill the selected cells.

One advantage of using the fill command is that it gives you more control over how Excel fills in the cells. For example, if you're filling a column of numbers and there are some blank cells in the column, you can choose to have Excel skip those blank cells and only fill in the non-blank cells.

Using the Paint Bucket Tool

The paint bucket tool is located in the Drawing Tools tab of the ribbon. To use the paint bucket tool, simply click on the cell that you want to start from and then drag your mouse over the other cells that you want to fill. The paint bucket tool will automaticallyfill in those cells with whatever color or pattern you've selected.

One advantage of usingthe paint bucket tool is that it's very quick and easy to use. However, like withthe fill handle, it can be difficult to control exactly how Excel fills inthe cells. For example, if you're trying to fill in a column of numbers andthere are some blank cells in the column, Excel may try to fill those blankcells with random numbers.

Move beyond 

Excel

Get started with Causal today.
Build models effortlessly, connect them directly to your data, and share them with interactive dashboards and beautiful visuals.